Latest Posts on This Week in Blogging

How to Be Original Online and Watch Out for Copycats

Last Updated on July 22, 2020 by Jeremy

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Last Updated on April 19, 2021 by Jeremy

Disclaimer: This Week in Blogging uses demographic data, email opt-ins, and affiliate links to operate this site. Please review our Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy.

It seems like we find a news story every week that is one big tech company copying another.

Facebook launching a Clubhouse clone. Facebook getting in on the Tiktok game. Spotify making moves to take on Clubhouse. Twitter launching a copy of Instagram stories called Fleets. LinkedIn even got into the stories game. We could go on.

Whenever a great new idea comes out on the scene, it is pretty safe to assume that every major player in the industry will throw a bunch of money at creating their own competitor. Why innovate when you can reverse engineer someone else's idea outright? Unfortunately, lack of originality happens just about everywhere and big tech isn't the only industry guilty of this.

This even cascades down to bloggers and social media users too. While verbatim copies of websites and social accounts can be remedied somewhat easily, imitators that are close but distinctly different (like all the tech clones mentioned above) are a problem for just about everyone- be it the biggest tech company or the smallest blogger.

In this one, we wanted to share a bit more on maintaining your originality online as well as protecting yourself when the imitation is literal theft.

Snapchat is Looking to Change E-Commerce

Last Updated on April 2, 2021 by Jeremy

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Snapchat may not have the cache of an Instagram, a Facebook, or even a TikTok, but don't tell Snapchat users that. Snapchat, perhaps more than more social networks, has always had a devoted base of users, and that devotion doesn't seem to be abating.

In fact, particularly with the younger demographic, the devoted fanbase seems only to be expanding. For years, people have been writing off Snapchat, but it's clear that Snapchat sure isn't writing off itself.

Just days ago, Snapchat (or more specifically Snap Inc.) acquired Fit Analytics, which is a Berlin-based company that helps shoppers pick the right clothing size when they're shopping online.

From the outside, it may not seem like a game-changing acquisition, but it is, and we'll tell you why.

Dispo – Instagram's Controversial New Challenger

Last Updated on March 30, 2021 by Jeremy

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Believe it or not, Dispo is already the 4th most downloaded social media app. That's no small feat, as there are almost too many photo-centric social media apps to count which have launched and subsequently burned before our eyes.

That's not to say that Dispo is necessarily here to stay, but they did have a promising start. Of course, that promising start is now in jeopardy, but for now, let's back things up and talk about what Dispo is.

Copytrack vs RYDE – Which Image Monitoring Service is For You?

Last Updated on March 30, 2021 by Jeremy

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Over the years, I've been forced to start using image monitoring services to check for copyright infringement of my photos online. From fellow bloggers to big brands and even my own city's tourist board, my photos have been used without my permission in just about every manner of outlet you can think of.

But how do you monitor your images online? Thankfully, third-party services exist that allow you to upload your images to their server, and then their proprietary algorithms find and log instances where your images are used outside of your domains and social channels.

Many of these also have a monetization element where they can invoice the infringers on your behalf, and even work with lawyers to take some cases to court in order to ensure you receive fair compensation for the theft.

Two services I've personally used over the years are Copytrack and RYDE, and while you can read more about both at their individual reviews (previous links), in this one I wanted to compare and contrast the two services directly.

Please note: We are affiliates of RYDE and would love it if you mentioned This Week in Blogging if you sign up; however, my views below include balanced pros and cons of both networks.

Niche Product Site Case Study #1 – Introducing the Sites

Last Updated on March 24, 2021 by Jeremy

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During quarantine, we saw a severe drop in traffic on our travel blog and local blog. As we knew that these sites were not going to rebound for quite some time, rather than doubling down in new topics on these established domains, we decided to start new blogs outright.

This was done for two reasons. First, the topics we wanted to write about didn't fit all too well with the established branding. Second, we know that new sites take a long time to establish themselves such that, while they weren't going to make much money during quarantine, we would be diversifying our portfolio for the long-haul across many unique domains.

At first, we had every intention of making these sites personality-driven blogs much like our travel sites (think full social media, multiple posts per week, a story involving us somehow, etc.), but we quickly realized that would be too time consuming. In fact, when we stopped to assess how things were going, we realized that we had started three sites all were niche products focused. Our ideal monetization model was not display advertising (although we'd certainly take it), but rather affiliate sales for a few core items.

As we are approaching each of these sites just a bit differently, we thought it'd be fun to share a periodic case study here talking about the sites, how we plan to monetize, and update their progress over time. So today, let's do a quick introduction to the sites and our monetization goals!

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